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Sharpe's Songs

The music of Sharpe made waves among the historical elitists when each episode was opened with a theme that included electric guitars. How many people can recall being in another room when the opening chords were struck and went running for the telly? It was such a distinctive theme for a Penninsular Wars-set series, even with the anachronistic guitars, that it ranks right up there with the famous opening music from MASH, Miami Vice, Mission Impossible, even Twilight Zone. The soundtrack of the Sharpe series, scored by John Tams and Dominic Muldowney, was spot on, delivering the right words, the right notes at the right times.

The music soldiers would have heard and enjoyed while on campaign or in the ale houses and taverns was as essential to the British Army as salt beef. While most songs and marches had their roots in centuries old folk music others were composed by coffee house fops who sold their sheet music for a penny a page. Many a campfire serenade led to new verses, new rails, all based off of age-old melodies. Of a richer tradition was the regimental music played by the pipes and drums that accompanied the soldiers. High spirits marked the quick march melodies, the slower marches were deliberate and majestic.

The most well-known of the Regimental songs was that of the 95th Rifles. To this day, Over The Hills is still played by the Drums and Bugles of the Rifles as their theme song. The history of the catchy tune actually dates back to 1706, long before the Rifles adopted it as their theme and oddly enough, was extremely popular in Colonial America.


Over the Hills and Far Away

This tune was published in Thomas D'Urfey's Pills to Purge Melancholy (Originally in 1706). It appeared in The Recruiting Officer, a comedy by George Farquhar and in John Gay's The Beggar's Opera (1728).

According to one source the tune is an older air whose origin is unkown. Another sources states the original air was Jockey's Lamentation or Jockey met with Jenny fair. John Tams wrote new lyrics to the tune for Sharpe's Rifles.

The tune was very popular in Colonial and Revolutionary America.

The following are the verses sung by John Tams over the closing credits of the various Sharpe episodes. They're shown in the order of the films and have probably been rearranged to fit in with the "theme" of each particular episode. The first verse is from the first *and* second episodes, the second verse from the third episode, etc. Possibly the chorus is sung "TO Flanders" after the first verse and "THROUGH Flanders" thereafter. Some words are spelt phonetically to indicate pronunciation. Differences in the last line from other verses are indicated by asterisks.

Here's fourteen shillings on the drum
For those who'll volunteer to come
To list and fight the foe today
Over the hills and far away

[Chorus:]

O'er the hills and o'er the main
To (through) Flanders, Portugal and Spain
King George commands and we obey
Over the hills and far away

Through smoke and fire and shot and shell
Unto the very walls of hell
We shall stand and we shall stay
Over the hills and far away

[chorus]

Now though I travel far from Spain
A part of me shall still remain
For you are with me night and day
*And* over the hills and far away

[chorus]

So fall in lads behind the drum
With Colours blazing like the sun
Along the road to come-what-may
Over the hills and far away

[chorus]

When evil stalks upon the land
I'll nyther hold nor stay me' hand
But fight to win a better day
Over the hills and far away

[chorus]

If I should fall to rise no more
As many comrades did before
Ask the pipes and drums to play
Over the hills and far away

[chorus]

Let Kings and tyrants come and go
I'll stand ajudged by what I know
A soldier's life I'll ne'er gainsay
Over the hills and far away

[chorus]

These are the words John Gay wrote.

MacHeath:
Were I laid on Greenland's coast,
And in my arms embrac'd my lass;
Warm amidst eternal frost,
Too soon the half year's night would pass.

And I would love you all the day.
Ev'ry night would kiss and play,
If with me you'd fondly stray
Over the hills and far away.

Polly:
Were I sold on Indian soil,
Soon as the burning day was clos'd,
I could mock the sultry toil
When on my charmer's breast repos'd.

I would love you all the day.
Ev'ry night would kiss and play,
If with me you'd fondly stray
Over the hills and far away.
Over the hills and far away...


Duet:
Were I laid on Greenland's coast,
And in my arms embrac'd my lass;
Warm amidst eternal frost,
Too soon the half year's night would pass

And I would love you all the day.
Ev'ry night would kiss and play,
If with me you'd fondly stray
Over the hills and far away.

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Blow the Candle Out
The earliest printed copy of this tune is found in Thomas Durfey's Wit and Mirth: or, Pills to Purge Melancholy (Volume in 1720) as The London Prentice. It was popular in England, Ireland and Scotland.

Variants and alternate titles include: The London Apprentice and The Jolly Boatsman (a variant in Kentucky).

It's of a young apprentice
Who went to court his dear
The moon was shining bright-e-ly,
The stars were twinkling clear
When he went to his love's window
To ease her of her pain
And she quick-e-ly rose and let him in
And went to bed again.

My father and my mother
In yonder room do lay
They are embracing one another
And so may you and I
They are embracing one another
Without a fear or doubt
Saying: Take me in your arms, my love,
And blow the candle out

My mother she'd be ang-e-ry
If she should come to know
My father he'd be angry too,
To prove my overthrow
I wouldn't forfeit five guineas
Now that they should find me out
Saying: Take me in your arms, my love,
And blow the candle out.

O when your baby it is born
You may dandle it on your knee
And if it be a baby boy
Then name it after me
For when nine months are over
My apprenticeship is out
I'll return and do my duty
And blow the candle out.

Now six months they were over,
Six months and a day
He wrote his love a letter,
That he was going away
He wrote his love a letter,
Without a fear or doubt
Saying he never should return again
To blow the candle out.

Come all you pretty young local girls
A warning take by me
And don't be quick to fall in love
With everyone you see
For when they're in their prenticeship
They'll swear their time is out
Then they'll leave you, as mine left me,
To blow the candle out.
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The Girl I Left Behind Me
Much folklore has arisen regarding this tune. One source states the tune was popular as far back as the reign of Elizabeth I and was played whenever a regiment left town or a man-of-war set sail. Another theory is that the tune originated in 1758 when Admirals Hawke and Rodney were watching the French fleet off the coast.

Research has shown that the tune was sung in America as early as 1650 and was a traditional fife tune, imported from England as Brighton Camp. The tune became generally popular during the Revolution. In Ireland it was known as The Rambling Laborer and The Spailpin Fanach and was first published in Dublin in 1791. The tune was also used for lyrics to a drinking song, Waxie's Dargle.

Version 1

I'm lonesome since I crossed the hill,
And o'er the moorland sedgy
Such heavy thoughts my heart do fill,
Since parting with my Betsey
I seek for one as fair and gay,
But find none to remind me
How sweet the hours I passed away,
With the girl I left behind me.

O ne'er shall I foget the night,
the stars were bright above me
And gently lent their silv'ry light
when first she vowed to love me
But now I'm bound to Brighton camp
kind heaven then pray guide me
And send me safely back again,
to the girl I left behind me

Her golden hair in ringlets fair,
Her eyes like diamonds shining
Her slender waist, her heavenly face,
that leaves my heart still pining
Ye gods above oh hear my prayer
to my beauteous fair to find me
And send me safely back again,
to the girl I left behind me

The bee shall honey taste no more,
the dove become a ranger
The falling waters cease to roar,
ere I shall seek to change her
The vows we made to heav'n above
shall ever cheer and bind me
In constancy to her I love,
the girl I left behind me.
Version 2

The hours sad I left a maid
A lingering farewell taking
Whose sighs and tears my steps delayed
I thought her heart was breaking
In hurried words her name I blest
I breathed the vows that bind me
And to my heart in anguish pressed
The girl I left behind me

Then to the east we bore away
To win a name in story
And there where dawns the sun of day
There dawned our sun of glory
The place in my sight
When in the host assigned me
I shared the glory of that fight
Sweet girl I left behind me

Though many a name our banner bore
Of former deeds of daring
But they were of the day of yore
In which we had no sharing
But now our laurels freshly won
With the old one shall entwine me
Singing worthy of our size each son
Sweet girl I left behind me

The hope of final victory
Within my bosom burning
Is mingling with sweet thoughts of thee
And of my fond returning
But should I n'eer return again
Still with thy love i'll bind me
Dishonors breath shall never stain
The name I leave behind me
Waxie's Dargle

Says my auld one to your auld one
Will you come to the Waxie's dargle
Says your auld one to my auld one
Sure I haven't got a farthing
I've just been down to Monto town
To see Uncle McArdle
But he wouldn't lend me a half a crown
To go to the Waxie's dargle

Chorus:
What'll you have, will you have a pint
Yes, I'll have a pint with you, sir
And if one of us doesn't order soon
We'll be thrown out of the boozer

Says my auld one to your auld one
Will you come to the Galway races
Says your auld one to my auld one
With the price of my auld lad's braces
I went down to Capel Street
To the pawn shop money lenders
But they wouldn't give me a couple of bob
On my auld lad's red suspenders

Chorus:
What'll you have, will you have a pint
Yes, I'll have a pint with you, sir
And if one of us doesn't order soon
We'll be thrown out of the boozer

Says my auld one to your auld one
We've got no beef nor mutton
But if we go down to Monto town
We might get a drink for nothin'
Here's a piece of good advice
I got from an auld fish-monger
When food is scarce and you see the hearse
You'll know you've died of hunger

Chorus:
What'll you have, will you have a pint
Yes, I'll have a pint with you, sir
And if one of us doesn't order soon
We'll be thrown out of the boozer

Waxies were candlemakers, traditionally women. "Dargle" was a term for a company or "works" outing (the name apparently derives from the Dargle River), an annual trip to Bray. Another source says the Dargle (a popular pub) was also a holiday haunt of the late eighteenth century Dublin candlemaker and grocer, Waxy O'Connor. Auld one: (old one) wife; Auld lad: (old lad) husband; Uncle: some versions use "Young Kill"
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Heart of Oak
The music to Heart of Oak was by Dr. William Boyce (1711-1779). The English words were written by the famous actor David Garrick (1716-1779) in 1759. Garrick is also credited with the theatrical blessing, "Break a Leg" as he was reportedly so involved in his performance of Richard III that he did not notice the pain of a fracture he incurred.

Dr Boyce was a songwriter in London, beginning around 1730. In 1757 he reached the peak of his career, being put in charge of the King's Band of Musick. He received a doctorate in 1749. In 1758 he was the organist at the Chapel Royal. His first compositions to appear in print were published in 1747. Boyce retired from music due to deafness and retired to Dorset.
There is an American set of lyrics, The Liberty Song.

Variants and alternate titles include: The London Apprentice and The Jolly Boatsman (a variant in Kentucky).

Come cheer up, my lads! 'tis to glory we steer,
To add something more to this wonderful year;
To honour we call you, not press you like slaves,
For who are so free as the sons of the waves?

Chorus

Hearts of oak are our ships, heart of oak are our men;
We always are ready, steady, boys, steady!
We'll fight and we'll conquer again and again.


We ne'er see our foes but we wish them to stay,
They never see us but they wish us away;
If they run, why we follow, and run them ashore,
For if they won't fight us, we cannot do more.

Chorus

They swear they'll invade us, these terrible foes,
They frighten our women, our children, and beaus;
But should their flat bottoms in darkness get o'er,
Still Britons they'll find to receive them on shore.

Chorus

We'll still make them fear, and we'll still make them flee,
And drub 'em on shore, as we've drubb'd 'em at sea;
Then cheer up, my lads! with one heart let us sing:
Our soldiers, our sailors, our statesmen and Queen.

Chorus
This is the American set of lyrics, known as The Liberty Song.

Come, join hand in hand, brave Americans all,
And rouse your bold hearts at fair Liberty's call;
No tyrannous acts shall suppress your just claim,
Or stain with dishonor America's name.

Chorus

In Freedom we're born and in Freedom we'll live.
Our purses are ready. Steady, friends, steady;
Not as slaves, but as Freemen our money we'll give.

Our worthy forefathers, let's give them a cheer,
To climates unknown did courageously steer;
Thro' oceans to deserts for Freedom they came,
And dying, bequeath'd us their freedom and fame.

Chorus

The tree their own hands had to Liberty rear'd,
They lived to behold growing strong and revered;
With transport they cried, Now our wishes we gain,
For our children shall gather the fruits of our pain.

Chorus

Then join hand in hand, brave Americans all,
By uniting we stand, by dividing we fall;
In so righteous a cause let us hope to succeed,
For heaven approves of each generous deed.

Chorus

In Freedom we're born and in Freedom we'll live.
Our purses are ready. Steady, friends, steady;
Not as slaves, but as Freemen our money we'll give.
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Bonny Light Horseman
The tune is believed to be over 400 years old and is most likely of Irish origin as it used the old Irish gapped scale (which did not use the 4th and 7th notes of the modern scale). The song appeared frequently in England after 1790 on broadsides printed in London, Birmingham and Preston.

The song, also known as Broken-Hearted I Wander, had widespread popularity during the Napoleonic Wars and inclued references to King George and Napoleon Bonaparte. Lyrics by William Barrett, although very similar, do not refer to the Napoleonic Wars.

There are several variants of the tune.
Napoleonic War version:

Ye maids, wives, and widows, I pray give attention,
Unto this sad tale I rehearse unto thee:
A maid in distress who will now be a rover,
She relies upon George for the loss of her love.
Broken-hearted I'll wander, for the loss of my lover,
My bonny light horseman, in the wars he was slain.

Three years and six months since he left England's shore,
My bonny light horseman, will I ne'er see him more?
He's mounted on horseback, so gallant and gay
And among the whole regiment respected was he.
Broken-hearted I'll wander, for the loss of my lover,
My bonny light horseman, in the wars he was slain.

When Boney commanded his armies to stand,
He levelled his cannon right over the land,
He levelled his cannons his victory to gain
And he slew my light horseman on the way coming hame.
Broken-hearted I'll wander, for the loss of my lover,
My bonny light horseman, in the wars he was slain.

The dove she laments for her mate as she flies;
'Oh where, tell me where is my darling?' she cries;
'And where in this world is there one to compare
With my bonny light horseman who was slain in the war?'
Broken-hearted I'll wander, for the loss of my lover,
My bonny light horseman, in the wars he was slain.
Old Irish version:

Ye maids, wives, and widows, I pray give attention,
Unto these few lines, tho' dismal to mention
I'm a maiden distracted, in the desert I'll rove,
To the gods I'll complain for the loss, of my love.
Broken-hearted I'll wander, broken-hearted I'll wander,
My bonny light horseman that was slain in the wars.

Had I wings of an eagle so quickly I'd fly,
To the very spot where my true love did die;
On his grave would I flutter my out-stretched wings,
And kiss his cold lips o'er and o'er again.
Broken-hearted I'll wander, broken-hearted I'll wander,
My bonny light horseman that was slain in the wars.

Two years and two months since he left England's shore,
My bonny light horseman that I did adore,
O why was I born this sad day to see,
When the drum beat to arms and did force him from me.
Broken-hearted I'll wander, broken-hearted I'll wander,
My bonny light horseman that was slain in the wars.

Not a lord, duke, or earl, could my love exceed,
Not a more finer youth for his king e'er did bleed;
When mounted on a horse he so gay did appear,
And by all his regiment respected he were.
Broken-hearted I'll wander, broken-hearted I'll wander,
My bonny light horseman that was slain in the wars.

Like the dove that does mourn when it loseth its mate,
Will I for my love till I die for his sake;
No man on this earth my affection shall gain,
A maid live and die for my love that was slain.
Broken-hearted I'll wander, broken-hearted I'll wander,
My bonny light horseman that was slain in the wars.

The Gallant Hussar
Commonly known as a London street melody which appeared often in comic songs. The ballad was also known as Young Edward, the Gallant Hussar. It appeared on numerous broadsides in the early and mid 1800s. Many of these can be found at the Bodleian Library. The Hussars were members of European light-cavalry used for scouting. The units were modeled on 15th-century Hungarian light-horse corps. In the 19th century some British Hussar regiments were converted from Light Dragoons.
A damsel possessed of great beauty,
She stood by her own father's gate,
The gallant hussars were on duty,
To view them this maiden did wait;
Their horses were capering and prancing,
Their accoutrements shone like a star,
From the plain they were nearest advancing,
She espied her young gallant hussar.

Their pellisses were slung on their shoulders,
So careless they seemed for to ride,
So warlike appeared these young soldiers,
With glittering swords by each side.
To the barracks next morning so early,
This damsel she went in her car,
Because she loved him sincerely-
Young Edward, the gallant Hussar.

It was there she conversed with her soldier,
These words he was heard for to say,
Said Jane, I've heard none more bolder,
To follow my laddie away.
0 fie! said young Edward, be steady,
And think of the dangers of war,
When the trumpet sounds I must be ready,
So wed not your gallant Hussar.

For twelve months on bread and cold water,
My parents confined me for you,
0 hard-hearted friends to their daughter,
Whose heart it is loyal and true;
Unless they confine me for ever,
Or banish me from you afar,
I will follow my soldier so clever,
To wed with my gallant Hussar.

Said Edward, Your friends you must mind them,
Or else you are for ever undone,
They will leave you no portion behind them,
So pray do my company shun.
She said, If you will be true-hearted,
I have gold of my uncle in store,
From this time no more we'll be parted,
I will wed with my gallant Hussar.

As he gazed on each elegant feature,
The tears they did fall from each eye,
I will wed with this beautiful creature,
And forsake cruel war, he did cry.
So they were united together,
Friends think of them now they're afar,
Crying; Heaven bless them now and for ever,
Young Jane and her gallant Hussar.

Lilli Burlero
Legend has it that this tune first appeared in 1641 in Ulster. Richard Talbot (1630-1691), a Catholic and royalist, had been made Earl of Tyrconnel after the Restoration. Later, King James II appointed him Lord Lieutenant of Ireland (1686). He pursued strong pro-Catholic policies. Even after James was deposed in England, Tyrconnel governed Ireland in James' name. Irish Catholic forces were eventually defeated by William of Orange. English and Irish Protestants took up the song as their melody during that time.

According to one source the words "lillibulero" and "bullen al-a" were used as a rallying cry for the Irish to recognize one another in the uprising in 1641. Later (1687) Thomas, Lord Wharton (1640-1715), wrote a set of satirical verses titled Lillibolero alluding to the Irish problems and set them to a melody arranged by Henry Purcell in 1678. Purcell's arrangement was based on an older tune under the name Quickstep which appeared in Robert Carr's Delightful Companion (1686). It became popular immediately. After the Stuarts were deposed, Lord Wharton, a strong supporter of William III, boasted that he had "rhymed James out of three kingdoms" with his tune.*

Irish writer Brendan Behan contradicted the claims by declaring the words of the chorus were a corruption of the Gaelic: "An lili ba leir e, ba linn an la" - roughly "The lily won the day for us." According to The Sources of Irish Traditional Music (1998) it translates as: Lilli/ bu le'ir o/, bu linn an la/ - Lilli will be manifest, the day will be ours. William Lilly (1602-1681), a famous astrologer who made predictions regarding British politics of the time, made the prediction "The Prophecy of the White King", in 1644 after Marston Moor, that a King would be beheaded or killed. Lilly wrote a letter to Charles I warning him of the prophecy.

An alternate story, from Songs That Made History by H. E. Piggot, states the refrain came from a popular Irish song when then Roman Catholic James II came to the the throne, containing the Irish words, "Lere, lere, burlere." Lere meaning "religion or faith" and burlere meaning "your faith". According to Piggot, a form of the tune was printed in 1661 in An Antidote Against Melancholy which was set to words beginning with "There was an old man of Waltham Cross".

John Gay used the tune in The Beggar's Opera which became the British Broadcasting Corporation's signature theme during World War II.

Just as "John Bull" would later be used to represent Englishmen, "Brother Teague" was then the nickname of the Irish.
Ho brother Teague,
Dost hear de decree?
Lilli burlero, bullen a la;
Dat we shall have a new deputie,
Lilli burlero, bullen a la.
Lero, lero, lilli burlero,
Lilli burlero, bullen a la
Lero, lero, lero lero
Lilli burlero, bullen a la

Ho, by my Soul, it is a Talbot;
Lilli burlero, bullen a la
And he will cut all de English throat
Lilli burlero, bullen a la
Lero, lero, lilli burlero,
Lilli burlero, bullen a la
Lero, lero, lero lero
Lilli burlero, bullen a la

Though, by my soul, de Enlish do prate,
Lilli burlero, bullen a la
De law's on dere side and de divil knows what,
Lilli burlero, bullen a la
Lero, lero, lilli burlero,
Lilli burlero, bullen a la
Lero, lero, lero lero
Lilli burlero, bullen a la

But if Depense do come from de Pope
Lilli burlero, bullen a la
We'll hang Magna Carta demselves on a rope
Lilli burlero, bullen a la
Lero, lero, lilli burlero,
Lilli burlero, bullen a la
Lero, lero, lero lero
Lilli burlero, bullen a la

And de good Talbot is now made a Lord,
Lilli burlero, bullen a la
And with his brave lads he's coming aboard,
Lilli burlero, bullen a la
Lero, lero, lilli burlero,
Lilli burlero, bullen a la
Lero, lero, lero lero
Lilli burlero, bullen a la

Who all in France have taken a swear,
Lilli burlero, bullen a la
Dat day will have no Protestant heir,
Lilli burlero, bullen a la
Lero, lero, lilli burlero,
Lilli burlero, bullen a la
Lero, lero, lero lero
Lilli burlero, bullen a la
O but why does he stay behind?
Lilli burlero, bullen a la
Ho, by my soul, 'tis a Protestant wind,
Lilli burlero, bullen a la
Lero, lero, lilli burlero,
Lilli burlero, bullen a la
Lero, lero, lero lero
Lilli burlero, bullen a la

Now that Tyrconnel is come ashore,
Lilli burlero, bullen a la
And we shall have comissions galore.
Lilli burlero, bullen a la
Lero, lero, lilli burlero,
Lilli burlero, bullen a la
Lero, lero, lero lero
Lilli burlero, bullen a la

And he dat will not go to Mass,
Lilli burlero, bullen a la
Shall be turned out and look like an ass,
Lilli burlero, bullen a la
Lero, lero, lilli burlero,
Lilli burlero, bullen a la
Lero, lero, lero lero
Lilli burlero, bullen a la

Now, now de hereticks all will go down,
Lilli burlero, bullen a la
By Christ and St. Patrick's the nation's our own,
Lilli burlero, bullen a la
Lero, lero, lilli burlero,
Lilli burlero, bullen a la
Lero, lero, lero lero
Lilli burlero, bullen a la

Dere was an old prophercy found in a bog,
Lilli burlero, bullen a la
Dat our land would be ruled by an ass and a dog, Lilli burlero, bullen a la
Lero, lero, lilli burlero,
Lilli burlero, bullen a la
Lero, lero, lero lero
Lilli burlero, bullen a la

So now dis old prophecy's coming to pass,
Lilli burlero, bullen a la
For James is de dog and Tyrconnel's de ass,
Lilli burlero, bullen a la
Lero, lero, lilli burlero,
Lilli burlero, bullen a la
Lero, lero, lero lero
Lilli burlero, bullen a la
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Johnny Is Gone for a Soldier
Thought to be an American adaptation of the Irish tune Shule Aroon, this song dates back to the 17th Century. It is also known as Buttermilk Hill and Shule Agra Johnny's Gone For a Soldier was popular during the the American Revolutionary War.

Alternately, the tune Shule Agra arose out of the Glorious Revolution of 1688. The Irish supported James II, and were defeated at the Boyne. William III, who defeated James, offered forgiveness to the rebels who would swear loyalty to him, but many preferred exile. The only evidence for this theory, is that some English versions have the line "But now my love has gone to France, To try his fortune to advance...."
Here I sit on Buttermilk Hill
Who can blame me, cryin' my fill
And ev'ry tear would turn a mill,
Johnny has gone for a soldier.

Me, oh my, I loved him so,
Broke my heart to see him go,
And only time will heal my woe,
Johnny has gone for a soldier.

I'll sell my rod, I'll sell my reel,
Likewise I'll sell my spinning wheel,
And buy my love a sword of steel,
Johnny has gone for a soldier.

I'll dye my dress, I'll dye it red,
And through the streets I'll beg for bread,
For the lad that I love from me has fled,
Johnny has gone for a soldier.
Here I sit on Buttermilk Hill
Who could blame me cry my fill,
Every tear would turn a mill,
Johnny's gone for a soldier.

Chorus

Oh my baby, oh my love,
Gone the rainbow, gone the dove,
Your father was my only love,
Johnny's gone for a soldier.


Me, oh my, I loved him so,
It broke my heart to see him go,
And only time will heal my woe,
Johnny's gone for a soldier.

Chorus

I sold my flax, I sold my my wheel,
To buy my love a sword of steel,
So it in battle, he may wield,
Johnny's gone for a soldier.

Chorus
With fife and drum he marched away
He would not heed what I did say
He'll not come back for many a day
Johnny has gone for a soldier.

Chorus

Shule, shule, shule agra
Sure, ah sure, and he loves me
When he comes back we'll married be
Johnny has gone for a soldier.

I'll go up on Portland Hill
And there I'll sit and cry my fill
And every tear should turn a mill
Johnny has gone for a soldier.

Chorus

I'll sell my rock, I'll sell my reel
I'll sell my flax and spinning wheel
To buy my love a sword of steel
Johnny has gone for a soldier.

Chorus

I'll dye my petticoats crimson red
Through the world I'll beg my bread
I'll find my love alive or dead
Johnny has gone for a soldier.

Chorus
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The Minstrel Boy
The words are by Thomas Moore (1779-1852). (The last verse is a later addition.) The tune is an Ancient Irish Air The Moreen. In 1798 two of Moore's friends participated in the rebellion of the United Irishmen. One died in prison, another was wounded and another later hung. He refused to testify against them.
The Minstrel Boy to the war is gone
In the ranks of death you will find him;
His father's sword he hath girded on,
And his wild harp slung behind him;
"Land of Song!" said the warrior bard,
"Tho' all the world betrays thee,
One sword, at least, thy rights shall guard,
One faithful harp shall praise thee!"

The Minstrel fell! But the foeman's chain
Could not bring that proud soul under;
The harp he lov'd ne'er spoke again,
For he tore its chords asunder;
And said "No chains shall sully thee,
Thou soul of love and brav'ry!
Thy songs were made for the pure and free,
They shall never sound in slavery!"

Verse added later:

The Minstrel Boy will return we pray
When we hear the news, we all will cheer it,
The minstrel boy will return one day,
Torn perhaps in body, not in spirit.
Then may he play on his harp in peace,
In a world such as Heaven intended,
For all the bitterness of man must cease,
And ev'ry battle must be ended.
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The Wild Rover
A traditional Irish tune sung by Ramona and Patrich Harper in Sharpe's Honour. However, the origins are actually contested. The actual history of the song is suggested by the fact that a collection of ballads, dated between 1813 and 1838, is held in the Bodleian Library. The printer, Catnach, was based in the "7 Dials" area of Covent Garden, London. The Bodleian bundle contains "The Wild Rover". The Greig-Duncan collection contains no less than six versions of the song. It was compiled by Gavin Greig 1848–1917.
I've been a wild rover for many's a year
And I've spent all my money on whiskey and beer
And now I'm returnin' with gold in great store
And I never will play the wild rover no more.

Chorus

And it's No! Nay! Never!
No nay never no more
And I'll play the wild rover
No never no more.

Chorus

I went to an alehouse I used to frequent
And I told the landlady my money was spent
I asked her for credit, she answered me nay
Saying, "Custom like yours I can have any day!"

Chorus

I took from my pocket ten sovereigns bright
And the landlady's eyes opened wide with delight
She said, "I have whiskeys and wines of the best
And the words that I told you were only in jest."

Chorus

I'll go home to my parents, confess what I've done
And I'll ask them to pardon their prodigal son
And when they have kissed me as oft-times before
I never will play the wild rover no more.
I've been a wild rover for many's the year,
and I spent all me money on whiskey and beer.
And now I'm returning with gold in great store,
and I never will play the wild rover no more.

Chorus

And it's no, nay, never! No, nay, never, no more,
will I play the wild rover. No (nay) never no more!


I went to an alehouse I used to frequent,
and I told the landlady me money was spent.
I asked her for credit, she answered me "nay,
such a custom as yours I could have any day".

Chorus

I pulled from me pocket a handful of gold,
and on the round table it glittered and rolled.
She said "I have whiskeys and wines of the best,
and the words that I told you were only in jest".

Chorus

I'll have none of your whiskeys nor fine Spanish wines,
For your words show you clearly as no friend of mine.
There's others most willing to open a door,
To a man coming home from a far distant shore.

Chorus

I'll go home to me parents, confess what I've done,
and I'll ask them to pardon their prodigal son.
And if they forgive me as oft times before,
I never will play the wild rover no more.

Chorus
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Spanish Bride
This is also known as Spanish Ladies and Farewell and Adieu to You. A traditional English sea shanty, describing a voyage from Spain to the Downs, it was called a capstan shanty (a shanty sung as the capstan was turned to raise the anchor), sung as ships were homeward bound. A ballad by the name of Spanish Lady was registered in England December 14, 1624 with the Stationers' Company. It is possible that tune is related to this tune or one of many variants listed in the registry.

The song's namesake, "Spanish Ladies," can most likely be traced to the period between 1793 and 1796 in which British ships would often dock in Spanish harbours while Spain and Britain were still allies in the First Coalition against Revolutionary France. While this may help to contextualize the song's mention of Spain, no truly definitive dating has surfaced as of yet. However, according to the Oxford Book of Sea Songs the earliest known reference to Spanish Ladies is in the logbook of the Nellie of 1796.

Its story is that of ships in fog (and therefore unable to determine their latitude by sighting) trying to find the entrance to the English Channel, between the dangers of Ushant to the south and the Isles of Scilly to the north. The sandy bottom is a good sign - and there is always the added reassurance of the width of the entrance, thirty-five leagues. A discussion in Arthur Ransome's novel Peter Duck notes that the succession of headlands on the English shore suggests a ship tacking up-channel, identifying a new landmark on each tack.

Collections list different distances from Ushant to Scilly. It is variously given as 34, 35 and 45 leagues. The depth of the Channel also varies from 55 to 45 fathoms by version. Special lyrics were written to the tune for the Bluenose (a famous Canadian sailing ship which sailed out of Nova Scotia).

There is no approximate age given for the song or tune. It is only listed as "famous old Naval song."
Farewell and adieu to you, Spanish Ladies,
Farewell and adieu to you, ladies of Spain;
For we've received orders for to sail for old England,
But we hope in a short time to see you again.

Chorus

We will rant and we'll roar like true British sailors,
We'll rant and we'll roar all on the salt sea.
Until we strike soundings in the channel of old England;
From Ushant to Scilly is thirty five leagues.


We hove our ship to with the wind from sou'west, boys
We hove our ship to, deep sounding [disambiguation needed]s to take;
'Twas forty-five fathoms[3] , with a white sandy bottom,
So we squared our main yard and up channel did make.

chorus

The first land we sighted was called the Dodman,
Next Rame Head off Plymouth, Start, Portland and Wight;
We sailed by Beachy, by Fairlight and Dover,
And then we bore up for the South Foreland light.

chorus

Then the signal was made for the grand fleet to anchor,
And all in the Downs that night for to lie;
Let go your shank painter, let go your cat stopper!
Haul up your clewgarnets, let tacks and sheets fly!

chorus

Now let ev'ry man drink off his full bumper,
And let ev'ry man drink off his full glass;
We'll drink and be jolly and drown melancholy,
And here's to the health of each true-hearted lass.

chorus
John Tams version, The Spanish Bride

O'er the hills and o'er the main
Through Flanders, Portugal and Spain
King George commands and we obey
Over the hills and far away

And we sailed out of England bound for Lisbon harbour
With bayonets a-gleaming and pride to the fore
We'd little to hope but we tried hard to cherish
The thoughts of our loved ones on England's fair shore

And soon we were transported through hell and its fury
Through smoke and through fire, through shot and through flame
And at Telavera we stole Boney's Eagle
And in that short time we were heroes of Spain

And I met with a maiden hair black as the raven
Her eyes they did glister like two diamonds bright
We spoke not a word at our very first meeting
And I lay in her arms all that long Spanish night

And we travelled together o'er mountain and valley
And she by my side through many's the fight
She tended my suffering and she salved me of pity
And bore me a daughter for my heart's delight

And we marched into Lisbon proud Wellington's army
The war being over it's homeward we're bound
And all on the quayside - the weeping and wailing
Four thousand women left on that cold ground

Farewell and adieu to you Spanish lady
Farewell and adieu to you ladies of Spain
For we're under orders to sail home to England
But I know in some time we'll return once again

And if ever I'm returning it's with gold in great plenty
And if I return it's with gold in great store
I'll search far and wide for my Spanish lady
Who brought me such peace in the midst of such war

Farewell and adieu to you Spanish lady
Farewell and adieu to you ladies of Spain
For we're under orders to sail home to England
But I know in some time we'll return once again
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Love Farewell
An example of Tams' theory that "you don't have to tiptoe around songs in a scholarly way. You can wrest what you want from the tradition and watch it spring back into shape." The first three verses of this song, traditional with additional lyrics by John Tams, were used in the Sharpe series. The last is from the BBC Radio 4 production of The Charge of the Light Brigade.
Traditional Version

Hark! I hear the Colonel crying,
"March, brave boys, there's no denying,
Colours flying, drums are beating,
March, brave boys, there's no retreating!"
Love, farewell!

The Major cries, "Boys, are yez ready?"
"Yes, your honour, firm and steady;
Give every man his flask of powder,
And his firelock on his shoulder!"
Love, farewell!

The mother crys, "Boys, do not wrong me,
Do not take my daughters from me!
If you do, I will torment yez!
After death my ghost will haunt yez!"
Love, farewell!

Oh, Molly, dear, you're young and tender,
And when I'm away, you won't surrender,
But hold out like an ancient Roman,
And I'll make you an honest woman.
Love, farewell!

Oh, Molly, darling, grieve no more,
I'm going to fight for Ireland's glory;
If I come back, I'll come victorious;
If I die, my soul in glory is!
Love, farewell!
John Tams Version

I thought I heard the Colonel crying
March brave boys there's no denying
Cannons roaring - drums abeating
March brave boys there's no retreating
Love Farewell

If I should fall in far off battle
Cannons roar and rifles rattle
Thoughts fly homeward - words unspoken
Valiant hearts are oftimes broken
Love Farewell

Will you go or will you tarry
Will you wait or will you marry
Would this moment last for ever
Kiss me now and leave me never
Love Farewell

I thought I heard the Colonel crying
March brave boys there's no denying
Cannons roaring - drums abeating
March brave boys there's no retreating
Love Farewell

Oh Judy should I die in glory
In the Times you'll read my story
But I'm so bothered by your charms
I'd rather die within your arms
Love Farewell
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Here's Adieu to All Judges and Juries
This ballad was printed in England on broadsides in the mid 1800s as Farewell to Your Judges and Juries and Farewell to Judges and Juries. Copies of these can be found at the Bodleian Library. There is speculation that it originated much earlier in music halls.
Here's adieu to all judges and juries,
Justice and Old Bailey too;
Seven years you've transported my true love,
Seven years he's transported I know.

How hard is the place of confinement
That keeps me from my heart's delight!
Cold irons and chains all bound round me,
And a plank for my pillow at night.

If I'd got the wings of an eagle,
I would lend you my wings for to fly,
I'd fly to the arms of my Polly love,
And in her soft bosom I'd lie.

And if ever I return from the ocean,
Stores of riches I'll bring to my dear;
And it's all for the sake of my Polly love
I will cross the salt seas without fear.
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The Rambling Soldier
Early records claim the words of this song on the early broadsides were about a soldier, not a sailor. In later stall sheets the occupation was predominantly sailor.

This song was modelled on the Irish song The Rambling Suiler, which means the rambling beggarman. The Rambling Suiler, in turn, parallels several songs allegedly composed by or about James V of Scotland who used to wander his kingdom in the disguise of "Gudeman of Ballengeich." His amorous exploits while in disguise are the subject of many of those songs.
I am a sailor stout and bold,
Long time I've plough'd the ocean;
I've fought for king and country too,
Won honour and promotion.
I said: My brother sailor I bid you adieu,
No more to sea will I go with you;
I'll travel the country through and through,
And I'll be a rambling sailor.

If you should want to know my name,
My name it is young Johnson.
I've got a commission from the king
To court young girls and handsome.
With my false hart and flattering tongue I court all girls both old and young, I court them all and marry none, And still be a rambling sailor.

The king's permission granted me
To range the country over;
From Bristol Town to Liverpool,
From Plymouth Sound to Dover.
And in whatever town I went,
To court young maidens I was bent;
And marry none was my intent,
But live a rambling sailor.

When I came to Woolwich Town
There were lasses plenty,
Boldly I stepped up to one to court her for her money
I said: My dear, what do you choose?
There's ale and wine and rum punch too,
Besides a pair of new silk shoes
To travel with a rambling sailor.

When I awoke all in the morn I left my love a-sleeping.
I left her for an hour or two
Whilst I go courting some other,
But if she stays till I return
She may stay there til the day of doom.
I'll court some other girl in her room
And still be a rambling sailor.
John Tams Version

I am a soldier,I will say,
That rambles for promotion.
I've laid the French and Spaniards low
Some miles across the ocean.
So now me jolly boys, I'll bid you all adieu:
No more to the wars will I go with you;
But I'll ramble the country through and through...
And I'll be a rambling soldier.

The king he has commanded me
To range this country over.
From Woolwich up to Liverpool,
From Plymouth back to Dover.
A courtin' all the girls, both old and young
With me ramrod in me hand, and me flattery tongue;
To court them all, but marry none...
And I'll be a rambling soldier.

And when these wars are at an end,
I'm not afraid to mention.
The King will give me my discharge,
A guinea and a pension.
No doubt some lasses will me blame,
But none of them will know my name:
And if you want to know the same...
It's - the rambling soldier!
Top
The Collier Recruit
From the coalfields in the north of England. Probably from the early nineteenth century.
O what's the matter wi' you my lass
And where's your dashing Jimmy?
O, the soldier boys have ta'en him up
And sent him far, far from me
Last payday he went off to town
And them red-coated fellows
Enticed him in and made him drunk
And he's better gone to the gallows.

The very sight of his cockade
It sets us all a'crying
And me I nearly fainted twice
I thought that I was dying
My father would have paid the smart
And he ran for the golden guinea
But the sergeant swore he'd kissed the book
And now they've got young Jimmy.

When Jimmy talks about the wars
It's worse than death to hear him
I have to go and hide my face
Because I cannot bear him
A brigadier or grenadier
He says they're bound to make him
But aye he laughs and cracks his jokes
And bids me not forsake him.

As I walked ower the stubble fields
Below it runs the seam
I thought of Jimmy hewing there
But it was all a dream
He hewed the very coals we burn
And when the fire I'm lighting
To think the coals was in his hands
It sets my heart to beating

So break my heart and then it's ower
So break my heart my dearie
And lay me in the cold ground
For of single life I'm weary
Top
The British Grenadiers
The British Grenadiers is a marching song for the grenadier units of the British military, the tune of which dates from the 17th century. It is the Regimental Quick March of the Corps of Royal Engineers, Grenadier Guards, the Honourable Artillery Company and the Royal Regiment of Fusiliers. It is also an authorised march of The Royal Gibraltar Regiment, The Royal Regiment of Canadian Artillery, The Canadian Grenadier Guards, The Royal Regiment of Canada, The Princess Louise Fusiliers, and The 5th Canadian Mounted Rifles.

A song entitled "The New Bath" found in Playford's dance books from the 17th century is thought to be the origin. However, it is also suggested that it was derived from the Dutch march "De Jonge Prins van Friesland" ("The Young Prince of Friesland", referring to Prince Johan Willem Friso); the first notes of this tune are similar. The march was introduced to Britain during the reign of the Dutch Stadholder-King William III. Today it is played as the Royal Inspection March in the Dutch army, and as a march to the crown prince.

The first known association of the tune with the regiment is in 1706 as 'The Granadeer's March', and the first version printed with lyrics from around 1750. It was a popular tune throughout the 18th and 19th centuries, and remains so until this day. During Operation Market Garden, a few men of the British 1st Airborne Division are said to have played this song using a flute and a few helmets and sticks as drums.

In the UK, it is played at Trooping the Colour. Additionally, the first eight measures are played during the ceremony when the Escort for the Colour marches into position on Horse Guards Parade.
Some talk of Alexander, and some of Hercules
Of Hector and Lysander, and such great names as these.
But of all the world's great heroes, there's none that can compare.
With a tow, row, row, row, row, row, to the British Grenadiers.

Those heroes of antiquity ne'er saw a cannon ball,
Or knew the force of powder to slay their foes withal.
But our brave boys do know it, and banish all their fears,
Sing tow, row, row, row, row, row, for the British Grenadiers.

Whene'er we are commanded to storm the palisades,
Our leaders march with fusees, and we with hand grenades.
We throw them from the glacis*, about the enemies' ears.
Sing tow, row, row, row, row, row, the British Grenadiers.

And when the siege is over, we to the town repair.
The townsmen cry, "Hurrah, boys, here comes a Grenadier!
Here come the Grenadiers, my boys, who know no doubts or fears!
Then sing tow, row, row, row, row, row, the British Grenadiers.

Then let us fill a bumper, and drink a health to those
Who carry caps and pouches, and wear the loupèd clothes.
May they and their commanders live happy all their years.
With a tow, row, row, row, row, row, for the British Grenadiers."
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Scotland the Brave
There is a contention that Robert Burns' "Scots, Wha Hae", a patriotic song of Scotland which served for a long time as an unofficial national anthem of the country, but has lately been largely supplanted by the modern "Scotland the Brave" and "Flower of Scotland", were the original lyrics set to a tune bearing a strong resemblance to the familiar tune of "Scotland the Brave" although it was played as a gentle air and not a rousing martial tune.

The lyrics were written by Robert Burns in 1793, in the form of a speech given by Robert the Bruce before the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314, where Scotland maintained its sovereignty from the Kingdom of England. Although the lyrics are by Burns, he wrote them to the traditional Scottish tune Hey Tuttie Tatie which, according to tradition, was played by Bruce's army at the Battle of Bannockburn, and by the Franco-Scots army at the Siege of Orleans. The tune for the older song is very similar to the more familiar tune for Scotland the Brave, which adds ammunition to the argument that today's Scotland the Brave was born from Burns' Scots, Wha Hae".

Scotland the Brave is the more widely-known of the two songs and is also the authorised pipe band march of The British Columbia Dragoons of the Canadian Forces and is played during the Pass in Review at Friday parades at The Citadel and The Virginia Military Institute. In 2006, it was adopted as the regimental quick march of the Royal Regiment of Scotland. In the 1982, 1986, and in the 1990 FIFA World Cup, the Scottish national team used it as its anthem prior to using "Flower of Scotland".

Hark where the night is falling
hark hear the pipes a calling
Loudly and proudly calling down thru the glen
There where the hills are sleeping
Now feel the blood a leaping
High as the spirits of the old highland men

Chorus
Towering in gallant fame
Scotland my mountain hame
High may your proud standards gloriously wave
Land of my high endeavor
Land of the shining river
Land of my heart forever, Scotland the Brave

High in the misty mountains
Out by the purple highlands
Brave are the hearts that beat beneath Scottish skies
Wild are the winds to meet you
Staunch are the friends that greet you
Kind as the love that shines from fair maidens eyes

Chorus

Far off in sunlit places
Sad are the Scottish faces,
Yearning to feel the kiss
Of sweet Scottish rain.
Where the tropics are beaming
Love sets the heart a-dreaming,
Longing and dreaming for the hameland again.

Chorus
Original lyrics by Robert Burns

Scots, wha hae wi' Wallace bled,
Socts, wham Bruce has aften led;
Welcome to your gory bed,
Or to victorie.

Now's the day, and now's the hour;
See the front o' battle lour;
See approach proud Edward's power ---
Chains and slaverie!

Wha will be a traitor-knave?
Wha can fill a coward's grave?
Wha sae base as be a slave?
Let him turn and flee!

Wha for Scotland's king and law
Freedom's sword will strongly draw,
--- Free-man stand, or Free-man fa',
Let him follow me!

By oppression's woes and pains!
By your sons in servile chains!
We will drain our dearest veins,
But they shall be free!

Lay the proud usurpers low!
Tyrants fall in every foe!
Liberty's in every blow!
Let us do, or die!
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Loch Lomond
There are many theories about the meaning of the song. One interpretation is that it is attributed to a Jacobite Highlander who was captured after the 1745 rising. The English played games with the Jacobites, and said that one of them could live and one would die. This is sung by the one who was sentenced to die, the low road referred to being the passage to the underworld. Some believe that this version is written to a lover who lived near the loch.

Another interpretation is that the song is sung by the lover of a captured rebel set to be executed in London following a show trial. The heads of the executed rebels were then set upon pikes and exhibited in all of the towns between London and Glasgow in a procession along the "high road" (the most important road), while the relatives of the rebels walked back along the "low road" (the ordinary road travelled by peasants and commoners). It captures some of the romantic spirit of the lost cause of Bonnie Prince Charlie.

"The Bonnie Banks o' Loch Lomond", or simply "Loch Lomond" for short, is a well-known traditional Scottish song. It was first published in 1841 in Vocal Melodies of Scotland, but is known to have originated much earlier. Loch Lomond is a large Scottish loch located between the traditional counties of Dunbartonshire and Stirlingshire. The Bonnie Banks o' Loch Lomond is often the final piece of music played during an evening of revelry (a disco or dinner, etc.) in Scotland, a phenomenon not seen in other parts of the United Kingdom.

The Irish variant of the song is called "Red Is the Rose" and is sung with the same melody but different (although similarly themed) lyrics.[8] It was popularized by Irish folk musician Tommy Makem. Even though many people mistakenly believe that Makem wrote "Red is the Rose", it is a traditional Irish folk song.

By yon bonnie banks
And by yon bonnie braes,
Where the sun shines bright
On Loch Lomond
Oh we twa ha'e pass'd
sae mony blithesome days,
On the bonnie, bonnie banks
O' Loch Lomond.

Chorus
Oh ye'll tak' the high road
and I'll tak' the low road,
An' I'll be in Scotland before ye',
But wae is my heart until we meet again
On the Bonnie, bonnie banks
O' Loch Lomond.

I mind where we parted
In yon shady glen
On the steep, steep side
O' Ben Lomon'
Where in purple hue
The highland hills we view
And the morn shines out
Frae the gloamin'

Chorus

The wee bird may sing
An' the wild flowers spring;
An' in sunshine the waters are sleepin'
But the broken heart
It sees nae second spring,
And the world does na ken
How we're greetin'

Chorus
Irish Variant "Red is the Rose" chorus

Red is the rose that in yonder garden grows
And fair is the lily of the valley
Clear are the waters that flow from the Boyne
But my love is fairer than any
Top
The Gentleman Soldier


The Gentleman Soldier also called The Soldiers Cloak and The Sentry Box is a very old tune that is popular with many folk groups. The tune has a military character; it sounds as if it is founded on bugle calls, and would make a first-class regimental march. However, it is very doubtful that it was originally an army tune. Scottish farm-hands know it as Drumdelgie. In Ireland it is attached to a comic song, Cassidy Brought Me Home, while the Welsh have it a a romantic piece, Dydd Llun y Boreu. It was probably a dance-tune to start with. A “gentleman soldier” is one of a yeomanry regiment
It's of a gentleman soldier,
as a sentry he did stand,
He kindly saluted a fair maid
by waving of his hand.
So boldly then he kissed her,
and passed it off as a joke.
He drilled her into the sentry box,
wrapped up in a soldier's cloak.

Chorus:
For the drums did go with a rap-a-tap-tap,
And the fifes did loudly play,
Saying: 'Fare you well, my Polly dear,
I must be going away.'

Oh, all night they tossed and tumbled,
till daylight did appear.
The soldier rose, put on his clothes,
saying: 'Fare thee well, my dear,
For the drums they are a-beating,
and the fifes so sweetly play;
If it warn't for that, dear Polly,
along with you I'd stay.'

Chorus

'Now, come, you gentleman soldier,
and won't you marry me?'
'Oh, no, my dearest Polly,
such things can never be,
For married I am already,
and children I have three.
Two wives are allowed in the army,
but one's too many for me!'

Chorus

'If anyone comes a-courting you,
you treat 'em to a glass.
If anyone comes a-courting you,
you say you're a country lass.
You needn't even tell them
that ever you played this joke,
Thet ever you went in a sentry-box,
wrapped up in a soldier's cloak.'

Chorus

'It's come, my gentleman soldier,
why didn't you tell me so?
My parents will be angry
when this they come to know.'
When nine long months was up and past,
this poor girl she brought shame,
For she had a little militia boy,
and she couldn't tell his name.
'Twas on one Sunday evening
on sentry did I stand
I fell in love with some pretty girl
by shaking of her hand;
By shaking of her hand,
my boys, and the passing of a joke,
I slipped her into the sentry box
and roll'd her up in my cloak.

Chorus:
For the drums did go with a rap-a-tap-tap,
And the fifes did loudly play,
Saying: 'Fare you well, my Polly dear,
I must be going away.'

O! there we toss'd and tumbl'd
till daylight did appear
Then I arose, put on my clothes,
saying, "Fare you well my dear.
The drums they are a-beating
and the fifes so sweetly play,
If it wasn't for that, dear Polly,
along with you I'd stay."

Chorus

If anyone comes a-courting you,
you treat them with a glass -
If anyone comes a-courting you,
say you're a country lass.
You need not even tell them that
ever you pass'd a joke,
That ever you went in a sentry box
wrapp'd up in a soldier's cloak.

Chorus

"Now come, my valiant young soldier,
O! won't you marry me?"
O! no, my dearest Polly,
such things they never can be,
For married I am already
and children I have three,
Two wives are allow'd in the army,
but one is enough for me."

Chorus

"O! now, my valiant young soldier,
Why hadn't you told me so?
My parents they'll be angry
if ever they come to know. "
When nine long months was up and pass'd
this this poor girl she brought shame,
For she had a little militia boy
and she could not tell his name.
Well its all a gentleman soldier
a sentry he will stand
He will salute a fair maid
by the waving of his hand
So boldly then he kisses her
and passes off as a joke
He drilled her up in the sentry box
wrapped up in a soldier's cloak

Chorus:
And the drums go as a rattittat
And the pipes did loudly play
Fare thee well Polly me dear
I must be going away

All night they tossed and tumbled
Till day light did appear
The soldier rose put on his clothes
Said fare thee well me dear
From the drums are a sounding
And pipes a sweetly play
If it weren't dear Polly then I'd stay

Chorus

On come you gentleman soldier
Won't you marry me
Oh no me dear said he,
said things never could be
For I have a wife already
and children I have three
Two wives is a lovely army
But one is too many for me

Chorus

If anyone comes a courting
You can treat them with a glass
If anyone come a courting
You can say you're a country lass
You don't have to tell them
That ever a famous joke
That you good in the century box
Wrapped up in the soldier's coat

Chorus

Oh come you gentleman soldier
Why didn't you tell me so
My parents will be angry
when this they get to know
And when nine long months come and passed
And this poor girl she brought shame
She had a little militia boy
And she didn't know his name
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Only Remembered


John Tams adapted the words of Horatius Bonar for his own arrangement of this hymn. The use of this hymn in Sharpe's Justice was not historically accurate like most of the songs and hymns throughout the Sharpe series were. Bonar would have been only 4 years old during the time in which Sharpe's Justice was set. The words of this hymn was set to music in 1891 by Ira D. Sankey who sang it as a solo in the Tabernacle in London at the funeral of his friend, C. H. Spurgeon, the great London preacher.

Vance Randolf, a famous folklorist who studied the folklore of the Ozarks, included the hymn in his "The Ozark Folksongs Collection" part of a four volume work as published by the State Historical Society of Missouri between 1946 and 1950.


Fading away like the stars in the morning,
Losing their light in the glorious sun,
Thus would we pass from this earth and its toiling?
Only remembered for what we have done.

Only remembered, only remembered,
Only remembered for what we have done.
Thus would we pass from this earth and its toiling?
Only remembered for what we have done.

Only the truth in the life we have spoken,
Only the seed that in life we have sown:
These shall pass onwards when we are forgotten:
Only remembered for what we have done.

Only remembered, only remembered,
Only remembered for what we have done.
These shall pass onwards when we are forgotten:
Only remembered for what we have done.

Who'll sing the anthem, and who'll tell the story?
Will the line hold; will it scatter and run?
Shall we at last be united in glory?
Only remembered for what we have done?

Only remembered, only remembered,
and only remembered for what we have done.
Shall we at last be united in glory?
Only remembered for what we have done?
From Randolph's Folksongs of the Ozarks

Up and away like the dew of the morning,
Soaring from earth to its heavenly home,
Thus would I leave from this world and its toiling:
Only remembered for what I have done.

Chorus:
Only remembered, Only remembered,
Only remembered for what we have done;
Only remembered, Only remembered,
Only remembered for what we have done.

Shall we be missed when others succeed us,
Reaping the fields we in spring time have sown?
Nay, for the sower shall pass from his labor,
Only remembered for what he has done.

Chorus

Only the truth that in life we have spo ken,
Only the seeds that on Earth we have sown,
These shall pass on ward while we are forgotten,
Only remembered for what we have done.

Chorus
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Eighteenth Day of June


A pre-EEC song from the days when British and French Armies set about each other all over Europe. Interestingly the British tradition has more songs in it about Napoleon than it does about its own heroes. However, this song is typical of the genre with its triumphant melody and patriotic lyrics. It is sung equally lustily by The Wilson Family from the North East of England. Their version of the song comes from Pete Woods, fine singer and long standing friend of theirs from Tyneside. Frank Kidson's "Traditional Tunes" (1891) has a much longer version of this song—which he calls "The Plains of Waterloo" — with nineteen instead of the Wilsons' five verses. Frank Harte sang this song as "Napoleon's Defeat" on the 2003 CD "Irish Songs from Old New England".
Click to play
The Wilson Family Arrangement, The Eighteenth Day of June

On the 18th day of June, me boys, eighteen hundred and fifteen,
Both horse and foot they did advance; most glorious to be seen,
Both horse and foot they did advance and the bugle-horn did blow
Where the sons of France we made to dance on the Plains of Waterloo.

Our cavalry advanced with true and valiant heart
Our infantry and artillery did nobly play their part.
While the small arms they did rattle and the great guns they did roar
All on the Plains of Waterloo where the thundering cannons roar.

The French dogs made a stout attack in front of Mount Saint John,
Threw on their best battalions for the village for to gain.
Our infantry first charged them and made them face about
Sir William with his heavy brigade soon put them to the rout.

Napoleon, like a bantam cock, sat mounted on a bar
He much did wish to represent brave Mars the god of war.
On a high platform there he did stand and loudly he did crow,
He drooped his wings and turned his tail to us at Waterloo.

The valiant Duke of Brunswick fell in the field that day,
And many a gallant officer fell in the awful fray.
And many a British soldier lay wounded in their gore,
Upon the plains of Waterloo where the thundering cannons roar.

(Repeat first verse)
Frank Harte Arrangement, Napoleon's Defeat

You ancient sons of glory are all great men, they say,
Whilst we in future story may join as well as they.
Our noble fathers' ancient sons have conquered many's the foe.
As long as fame their names proclaim who fought on Waterloo.

It was on June the eighteenth day, eighteen hundred and fifteen.
With horse and foot we did advance most glorious to be seen.
With horse and foot we did advance while the bugles loud they blew.
We showed the French at Waterloo what Britain's sons could do.

Our cavalry advancing with a bold and a gallant heart,
Our infantry, artillery so nobly played their part,
Our small guns they did rattle, our great guns they did roar,
All on the plains of Waterloo where the murdering cannons roar.

Here is to Sir William Ponceby I am sorry for to say.
In leading his Enniskillen dragoons he met his fate that day.
At the head of his brigade I saw him fall, that grieved my heart full sore.
I saw him lie as we passed by with many thousands more.

Napoleon like a Bantam cock sat a-mounted on his spurs.
And hard he tried to represent grim as the god of war.
On his high platform where he did stand and there so loud he crew,
He drooped his wings and turned his head and fled from Waterloo.

When Napoleon found the battle lost, he cries, “I am undone.”
He wrung his hands and tore his hair, crying, “Oh, my darling son,
Straightway to Paris I will go and king I will crown you
Before they hear of my defeat on the plains of Waterloo.”
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